Women's Health Network

Women's Health Network

Women Health
Reported usage of adequate contraception by women has risen only slightly between 1990 and 2014, with considerable regional variability. Although global usage is around 55{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39}, it may be as low as 25{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} in Africa. Worldwide 222 million women have no or limited access to contraception. PublisherElsevier USAPublication typeJournalsISSN , Coverage Scope Women’s Health Issues is a peer-reviewed, bimonthly, multidisciplinary journal that publishes research and review manuscripts related to women’s health care and policy.
Find information on birth control, menstruation, breasts, osteoporosis, menopause, female cancers, and tests and treatments specific to women’s health. STDs, reproductive issues and birth control methods affect women’s sexual health.
Women’s bodies go through major changes throughout their lives, leading to differences in health concerns for varying age groups. During times of physiological change, women are more susceptible to mental health issues like depression, anxiety and eating disorders. In adulthood, sexual health issues like fertility, avoiding STDs and practicing safe birth control gain importance. After menopause, some women experience health conditions caused by changes in hormone levels. Fortunately, most of the diseases that affect women are treatable if detected early, and women can live long and happy lives by following simple health tips.
The highest incidence occurs in Eastern Africa, where with Middle Africa, cervical cancer is the commonest cancer in women. The case fatality rate of 52{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} is also higher in developing countries than in developed countries (43{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39}), and the mortality rate varies by 18-fold between regions of the world. Abortion is the intentional termination of pregnancy, as compared to spontaneous termination . Abortion is closely allied to contraception in terms of women’s control and regulation of their reproduction, and is often subject to similar cultural, religious, legislative and economic constraints. Consequently, abortion rates may be used to estimate unmet needs for contraception. However the available procedures have carried great risk for women throughout most of history, and still do in the developing world, or where legal restrictions force women to seek clandestine facilities. Access to safe legal abortion places undue burdens on lower socioeconomic groups and in jurisdictions that create significant barriers.
Research needs include diseases unique to women, more serious in women and those that differ in risk factors between women and men. The balance of gender in research studies needs to be balanced appropriately to allow analysis that will detect interactions between gender and other factors. They also suggest it is the role of health organisations to encourage women to enroll in clinical research. Globally, cervical cancer is the fourth commonest cancer amongst women, particularly those of lower socioeconomic status. Women in this group have reduced access to health care, high rates of child and forced marriage, parity, polygamy and exposure to STIs from multiple sexual contacts of male partners. In developing countries, cervical cancer accounts for 12{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} of cancer cases amongst women and is the second leading cause of death, where about 85{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} of the global burden of over 500,000 cases and 250,000 deaths from this disease occurred in 2012.
Women Health
The Women’s Health Research Center is creating a new era in women’s health. Thus, risk of some diseases, their diagnoses and responses to treatments — including response to some medications — differ between women and men. Soon, new technologies will emerge to assist care providers in treating women’s health conditions. Other developing medical technologies include an at home, do-it-yourself Pap smear and a test that determines pregnancy using saliva as a sample. In 2019, our teams provided medical care to over 28,800 victims of sexual violence; most were women and girls, but there is increasing awareness of sexual violence committed against men and boys. The care we offer covers preventive treatment against sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and vaccinations for tetanus and hepatitis B.