Sandpoint Women's Health

Sandpoint Women's Health

Women Health
Global women’s health has a much larger focus on reproductive health than that of developed countries alone, but also infectious diseases such as malaria in pregnancy and non-communicable diseases . Many of the issues that face women and girls in resource poor regions are relatively unknown in developed countries, such as female genital cutting, and further lack access to the appropriate diagnostic and clinical resources.
Comorbidity from other non reproductive disease such as cardiovascular disease contribute to both the mortality and morbidity of pregnancy, including preeclampsia. Sexually transmitted infections have serious consequences for women and infants, with mother-to-child transmission leading to outcomes such as stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and pelvic inflammatory disease leading to infertility. In addition infertility from many other causes, birth control, unplanned pregnancy, unconsensual sexual activity and the struggle for access to abortion create other burdens for women.
Research needs include diseases unique to women, more serious in women and those that differ in risk factors between women and men. The balance of gender in research studies needs to be balanced appropriately to allow analysis that will detect interactions between gender and other factors. They also suggest it is the role of health organisations to encourage women to enroll in clinical research. Globally, cervical cancer is the fourth commonest cancer amongst women, particularly those of lower socioeconomic status. Women in this group have reduced access to health care, high rates of child and forced marriage, parity, polygamy and exposure to STIs from multiple sexual contacts of male partners. In developing countries, cervical cancer accounts for 12{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} of cancer cases amongst women and is the second leading cause of death, where about 85{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} of the global burden of over 500,000 cases and 250,000 deaths from this disease occurred in 2012.
While the rates of the leading causes of death, cardiovascular disease, cancer and lung disease, are similar in women and men, women have different experiences. Lung cancer has overtaken all other types of cancer as the leading cause of cancer death in women, followed by breast cancer, colorectal, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers. While smoking is the major cause of lung cancer, amongst nonsmoking women the risk of developing cancer is three times greater than amongst nonsmoking men. HPV vaccine together with screening offers the promise of controlling these diseases. Other important health issues for women include cardiovascular disease, depression, dementia, osteoporosis and anemia. JGWH is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, international journal of Juniper group that publishes scientific works within the field of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health. Gynecology deals with the functions and diseases specific to women and girls, especially those affecting the reproductive system.
Women Health
The highest incidence occurs in Eastern Africa, where with Middle Africa, cervical cancer is the commonest cancer in women. The case fatality rate of 52{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39} is also higher in developing countries than in developed countries (43{06e5c851e71f046c386a74248b3a53282284dae0fc18af42c313779a50d46a39}), and the mortality rate varies by 18-fold between regions of the world. Abortion is the intentional termination of pregnancy, as compared to spontaneous termination . Abortion is closely allied to contraception in terms of women’s control and regulation of their reproduction, and is often subject to similar cultural, religious, legislative and economic constraints. Consequently, abortion rates may be used to estimate unmet needs for contraception. However the available procedures have carried great risk for women throughout most of history, and still do in the developing world, or where legal restrictions force women to seek clandestine facilities. Access to safe legal abortion places undue burdens on lower socioeconomic groups and in jurisdictions that create significant barriers.
Women also need health care more and access the health care system more than do men. While part of this is due to their reproductive and sexual health needs, they also have more chronic non-reproductive health issues such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, mental illness, diabetes and osteoporosis. Another important perspective is realising that events across the entire life cycle (or life-course), from in utero to aging effect the growth, development and health of women.
These issues have frequently been the subject of political and feminist campaigns where differing viewpoints pit health against moral values. Although women in industrialised countries have narrowed the gender gap in life expectancy and now live longer than men, in many areas of health they experience earlier and more severe disease with poorer outcomes. Gender remains an important social determinant of health, since women’s health is influenced not just by their biology but also by conditions such as poverty, employment, and family responsibilities.
What’s more, men and women may have the same condition, but different symptoms. Many diseases affect women differently and may even require distinct treatment.
These include the child’s financial future, her dowry, social ties and social status, prevention of premarital sex, extramarital pregnancy and STIs. The arguments against it include interruption of education and loss of employment prospects, and hence economic status, as well as loss of normal childhood and its emotional maturation and social isolation. Child marriage places the girl in a relationship where she is in a major imbalance of power and perpetuates the gender inequality that contributed to the practice in the first place.